This blog is for Communication among Marines and people interested in the Marines. The 10 is for Communications. The Photo above is Marble Mountain, Danang, Vietnam.

Jan 27, 2017

Vietnam Casualties

Vietnam War Casualties By Branch of Service


http://www.americanwarlibrary.com/vietnam/vwc18.htm

Vietnam War Casualties By Branch of Service



The U.S. Marine Corps in the Vietnam War
USMC FS PhotoThe U.S. Marine Corps provided ground, air, supply, and logistic support in the Vietnam War for over two decades as part of III Marine Amphibious Force. Initially in Vietnam as advisors, the Marines forces grew with the need to protect the key airbase at Da Nang. After the Gulf of Tonkin incident, more troops arrived and the Marines began to engage in the counterinsurgency effort with small-scale pacification units. Combined Action Platoons – comprised of U.S. Marines and Vietnamese soldiers – were a novel concept that the Marines brought.
By 1966, there were nearly 70,000 Marines in Vietnam carrying out large scale ground operations against the Viet Cong. In addition to ground combat, the Marines Corps provided air support from helicopter squadrons and fixed-wing aircrafts striking targets in South and North Vietnam. In 1967, the Army leadership in Saigon advocated that the Marines concentrate their efforts on large unit search and destroy operations. The Marines’ mission was split, with fighting against the North Vietnamese Army along the demilitarized zone (DMZ) toward the north, and a counterinsurgency operation waged against the Viet Cong in the villages in the south.
In the north, the Marines engaged in heavy fighting between Khe Sanh in the West and Leatherneck Square in the Eastern DMZ. They also began to create the McNamara line, a series of strong points, sensors and obstacles meant to detect communist forces crossing the DMZ. The North Vietnamese focused much of their firepower on destroying the McNamara line in its early stages, resulting in many conflicts, most notably Con Thien. The McNamara line ultimately failed to materialize, but the Marines were largely successful in stemming the flow of communist forces across the DMZ, although at a large price. 3,461 Marines were killed in action in 1967 and another 25,525 were wounded. Despite the fewer numbers, it was clear that more troops would not guarantee more success.
The year 1968 proved to be a watershed for the Marines in Vietnam. The January 31 Tet Offensive – the massive offensive the North Vietnamese launched against South Vietnam in 105 cities on the Tet Lunar Year – was largely repulsed by U.S. Marines and South Vietnamese forces. This was not the case at Hue, a city where Marines fought for 26 days before expelling the North Vietnamese. The Marines also defended Khe Sanh in a 77 day siege, under fire by as many as 1000 shells per day, until the U.S. Army’s 1st Cavalry Division broke the siege. 
After footage of these bloody battles was aired on television and with no clear end in sight by 1969, much of the American public support for the war eroded. President Nixon began to bring troops home. Few Marines units were involved in the U.S. military actions in Cambodia or Laos, and while 1st Marine Division fought in major engagements around Da Nang, 3d Marine Division was heading back to base at Okinawa. By 1971, the 1st Division and 3d Marine Aircraft Wing departed for the United States and Japan.  
Marine advisors, fire support personnel, and air units fought during the 1972 Easter Offensive supporting the Vietnamese Marine Corps. A peace treaty was signed in Paris in January 1973. The U.S. agreed to withdraw all of its forces from Vietnam and in turn the North Vietnamese returned its U.S. prisoners of war, 26 of whom were Marines. In 1975, Marines led Operations Eagle Pull and Frequent Wind to evacuate the American embassies in Phnom Penh and Saigon. Immediately after saving hundreds of American lives in the embassy evacuations, President Ford ordered the Marines to rescue the crew of the USS Mayaguez, which had been taken by the Khmer Rouge. A joint task force completed the mission and recaptured the ship, but not without Marine and U.S. Air Force casualties.
The Vietnam War was costly to the U.S. Marine Corps. From 1965 to 1975, nearly 500,000 Marines served in Southeast Asia. Of these, more than 13,000 were killed and 88,000 wounded, nearly a third of all American causalities sustained during the war.
Source: United States Marine Corps History Division





marzone.com/7thMarines/usmc_cas_stats.pdf


Vietnam War Casualties By Branch of Service


http://www.americanwarlibrary.com/vietnam/vwc18.htm

Vietnam War Casualties By Branch of Service



The U.S. Marine Corps in the Vietnam War
USMC FS PhotoThe U.S. Marine Corps provided ground, air, supply, and logistic support in the Vietnam War for over two decades as part of III Marine Amphibious Force. Initially in Vietnam as advisors, the Marines forces grew with the need to protect the key airbase at Da Nang. After the Gulf of Tonkin incident, more troops arrived and the Marines began to engage in the counterinsurgency effort with small-scale pacification units. Combined Action Platoons – comprised of U.S. Marines and Vietnamese soldiers – were a novel concept that the Marines brought.
By 1966, there were nearly 70,000 Marines in Vietnam carrying out large scale ground operations against the Viet Cong. In addition to ground combat, the Marines Corps provided air support from helicopter squadrons and fixed-wing aircrafts striking targets in South and North Vietnam. In 1967, the Army leadership in Saigon advocated that the Marines concentrate their efforts on large unit search and destroy operations. The Marines’ mission was split, with fighting against the North Vietnamese Army along the demilitarized zone (DMZ) toward the north, and a counterinsurgency operation waged against the Viet Cong in the villages in the south.
In the north, the Marines engaged in heavy fighting between Khe Sanh in the West and Leatherneck Square in the Eastern DMZ. They also began to create the McNamara line, a series of strong points, sensors and obstacles meant to detect communist forces crossing the DMZ. The North Vietnamese focused much of their firepower on destroying the McNamara line in its early stages, resulting in many conflicts, most notably Con Thien. The McNamara line ultimately failed to materialize, but the Marines were largely successful in stemming the flow of communist forces across the DMZ, although at a large price. 3,461 Marines were killed in action in 1967 and another 25,525 were wounded. Despite the fewer numbers, it was clear that more troops would not guarantee more success.
The year 1968 proved to be a watershed for the Marines in Vietnam. The January 31 Tet Offensive – the massive offensive the North Vietnamese launched against South Vietnam in 105 cities on the Tet Lunar Year – was largely repulsed by U.S. Marines and South Vietnamese forces. This was not the case at Hue, a city where Marines fought for 26 days before expelling the North Vietnamese. The Marines also defended Khe Sanh in a 77 day siege, under fire by as many as 1000 shells per day, until the U.S. Army’s 1st Cavalry Division broke the siege. 
After footage of these bloody battles was aired on television and with no clear end in sight by 1969, much of the American public support for the war eroded. President Nixon began to bring troops home. Few Marines units were involved in the U.S. military actions in Cambodia or Laos, and while 1st Marine Division fought in major engagements around Da Nang, 3d Marine Division was heading back to base at Okinawa. By 1971, the 1st Division and 3d Marine Aircraft Wing departed for the United States and Japan.  
Marine advisors, fire support personnel, and air units fought during the 1972 Easter Offensive supporting the Vietnamese Marine Corps. A peace treaty was signed in Paris in January 1973. The U.S. agreed to withdraw all of its forces from Vietnam and in turn the North Vietnamese returned its U.S. prisoners of war, 26 of whom were Marines. In 1975, Marines led Operations Eagle Pull and Frequent Wind to evacuate the American embassies in Phnom Penh and Saigon. Immediately after saving hundreds of American lives in the embassy evacuations, President Ford ordered the Marines to rescue the crew of the USS Mayaguez, which had been taken by the Khmer Rouge. A joint task force completed the mission and recaptured the ship, but not without Marine and U.S. Air Force casualties.
The Vietnam War was costly to the U.S. Marine Corps. From 1965 to 1975, nearly 500,000 Marines served in Southeast Asia. Of these, more than 13,000 were killed and 88,000 wounded, nearly a third of all American causalities sustained during the war.
Source: United States Marine Corps History Division





marzone.com/7thMarines/usmc_cas_stats.pdf

Dec 12, 2016

The female sleeping quarters

The Department of the Navy is now assigning females to quarters in a separate private OFF LIMITS area on all aircraft carriers...

Addressing all boat personnel at Pearl Harbor, CINCPAC advised, "The female sleeping quarters will be out-of-bounds for all males.  Anybody caught breaking this rule will be fined $20 the first time."

He continued, " Anybody caught breaking this rule the second time will be fined $50. 

Being caught a third time will cost you a fine of $100.   Are there any questions?"


At this point the Marine Sergeant Major from the security detail assigned to the ship inquired: 


"How much for a season pass???"



Nov 10, 2016

Marine Corps Birthday

 





U.S. Marine Corps Lieutenant General Joseph Osterman, deputy commander, U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) cuts a cake at the 241st Marine Corps Birthday Cake Cutting Celebration on MacDill Air Force Base.

Formal commemoration of the birthday of the Marine Corps began on 10 November 1921. That particular date was chosen because on that day the Second Continental Congress resolved in 1775 to raise two battalions of Continental Marines.

Throughout the world on 10 November, U.S. Marines celebrate the birth of their Corps -- the most loyal, most feared, most revered, and most professional fighting force the world has ever known.

(Photos by Tom Gagnier)
 
___________________________________________

Very nice Marine Corps Birthday celebration at MacDill Air Force Base put on by CentCom and SoCom at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa today.  They had a cake cutting ceremony at 10:00 am on Nov 9 for all the Marines. The Commandant's message is read, then they bring out the cake.  

Centcom (US Central Command) centcom.mil is a principle fighting Command of the US. They are in charge of Central Asia - Iraq and Afghanistan and surrounding areas. So the best and the brightest are here. It is commanded by a 4 Star - usually an Army or Marine General.

SoCom Special Operations Command. This is the Command of all the special forces - the Navy Seals, Delta Force, Marines Raiders, etc  socom.mil/default.aspx 

So the two top war fighting commands in the US are in Tampa. All the Marines from the two commands were there. Looking good. The Marines now wear their blue trousers with red stripe and the khaki shirt for formal occasions - short of the full dress blues.

The cake cutting ceremony cuts the cake with a sword, and involves giving the youngest and oldest Marines there a piece of cake. The oldest Marine was a retired guy working for Centcom - he was born in 1957.  Made me feel a bit old.

Semper Fi

Craig Hullinger, Marine





Another Birthday Celebration, this time in Sarasota on Nov 10, 2016.  Above, from right to left: Ron and Linda Wozniak, Craig Hullinger, Byron and Janet Hill.

The crowd was a bit older in Sarasota.  Woz and Craig were among the oldest Marines at CentCom. We were among the younger at Sarasota.

The oldest Marine was on Iwo Jima and was 96 years old. The youngest was 19.

Semper Fi




A father and son team at the Sarastoa Birthday event.







Aug 26, 2016

Leadership Traits

The Marine Corps is justifiably proud of its outstanding leaders. We get American teenagers to get up at O Dark Thirty, work out hard, and charge machine guns, all for minimum wage.

We spend a great deal of time training all of our Marines in leadership. Leadership is one of the most important concept Marines are taught during training. The traits are justice, judgement, dependability, integrity, decisiveness, tact, initiative, endurance, bearing, unselfishness, courage, knowledge, loyalty, and enthusiasm.

We were serious about learning these traits and all the other things we needed to learn in OCS. In a few months we would be leading Marines in combat.


Marine Corps Leadership Traits 

The 14 leadership traits are qualities of thought and action which, if demonstrated in daily activities, help Marines earn the respect, confidence, and loyal cooperation of other Marines. It is extremely important that you understand the meaning of each leadership trait and how to develop it, so you know what goals to set as you work to become a good leader and a good follower.

Justice: Definition: Justice is defined as the practice of being fair and consistent. A just person gives consideration to each side of a situation and bases rewards or punishments on merit. Suggestions for Improvement: Be honest with yourself about why you make a particular decision. Avoid favoritism. Try to be fair at all times and treat all things and people in an equal manner.

Judgement: Definition: Judgment is your ability to think about things clearly, calmly, and in an orderly fashion so that you can make good decisions. Suggestions for Improvement: You can improve your judgment if you avoid making rash decisions. Approach problems with a common sense attitude.

Dependability: Definition: Dependability means that you can be relied upon to perform your duties properly. It means that you can be trusted to complete a job. It is the willing and voluntary support of the policies and orders of the chain of command. Dependability also means consistently putting forth your best effort in an attempt to achieve the highest standards of performance. Suggestions for Improvement: You can increase your dependability by forming the habit of being where you're supposed to be on time, by not making excuses and by carrying out every task to the best of your ability regardless of whether you like it or agree with it.

Integrity: Definition: Integrity means that you are honest and truthful in what you say or do. You put honesty, sense of duty, and sound moral principles above all else. Suggestions for Improvement: Be absolutely honest and truthful at all times. Stand up for what you believe to be right.

Decisiveness: Decisiveness means that you are able to make good decisions without delay. Get all the facts and weight them against each other. By acting calmly and quickly, you should arrive at a sound decision. You announce your decisions in a clear, firm, professional manner. Suggestions for Improvement: Practice being positive in your actions instead of acting half-heartedly or changing your mind on an issue.

Tact: Definition: Tact means that you can deal with people in a manner that will maintain good relations and avoid problems. It means that you are polite, calm, and firm. Suggestions for Improvement: Begin to develop your tact by trying to be courteous and cheerful at all times. Treat others as you would like to be treated.

Initiative: Definition: Initiative is taking action even though you haven't been given orders. It means meeting new and unexpected situations with prompt action. It includes using resourcefulness to get something done without the normal material or methods being available to you. Suggestions for Improvement: To improve your initiative, work on staying mentally and physically alert. Be aware of things that need to be done and then to do them without having to be told.

Endurance:
Definition: Endurance is the mental and physical stamina that is measured by your ability to withstand pain, fatigue, stress, and hardship. For example, enduring pain during a conditioning march in order to improve stamina is crucial in the development of leadership. Suggestions for Improvement: Develop your endurance by engaging in physical training that will strengthen your body. Finish every task to the best of your ability by forcing yourself to continue when you are physically tired and your mind is sluggish.

Bearing: Definition: Bearing is the way you conduct and carry yourself. Your manner should reflect alertness, competence, confidence, and control. Suggestions for Improvement: To develop bearing, you should hold yourself to the highest standards of personal conduct. Never be content with meeting only the minimum requirements.

Unselfishness:
Definition: Unselfishness means that you avoid making yourself comfortable at the expense of others. Be considerate of others. Give credit to those who deserve it.
Suggestions for Improvement: Avoid using your position or rank for personal gain, safety, or pleasure at the expensive of others. Be considerate of others.

Courage: Definition: Courage is what allows you to remain calm while recognizing fear. Moral courage means having the inner strength to stand up for what is right and to accept blame when something is your fault. Physical courage means that you can continue to function effectively when there is physical danger present. Suggestions for Improvement: You can begin to control fear by practicing self-discipline and calmness. If you fear doing certain things required in your daily life, force yourself to do them until you can control your reaction.

Knowledge:
You are supposed to be the subject matter expert in your field. Are you? Is your talent trusted? Definition: Knowledge is the understanding of a science or art. Knowledge means that you have acquired information and that you understand people. Your knowledge should be broad, and in addition to knowing your job, you should know your unit's policies and keep up with current events.Suggestions for Improvement: Suggestions for Improvement: Increase your knowledge by remaining alert. Listen, observe, and find out about things you don't understand. Study field manuals and other military literature.

Loyalty: Definition: Loyalty means that you are devoted to your country, the Corps, and to your seniors, peers, and subordinates. The motto of our Corps is Semper Fidelis!, (Always Faithful). You owe unwavering loyalty up and down the chain of command, to seniors, subordinates, and peers. Suggestions for Improvement: To improve your loyalty you should show your loyalty by never discussing the problems of the Marine Corps or your unit with outsiders. Never talk about seniors unfavorably in front of your subordinates. Once a decision is made and the order is given to execute it, carry out that order willingly as if it were your own.

Enthusiasm: Definition: Enthusiasm is defined as a sincere interest and exuberance in the performance of your duties. If you are enthusiastic, you are optimistic, cheerful, and willing to accept the challenges. Suggestions for Improvement: Understanding and belief in your mission will add to your enthusiasm for your job. Try to understand why even uninteresting jobs must be done.

References:

Marine Leadership Traits | Marines.com

www.marines.com/being-a-marine/leadership

United States Marine Corps
Justice. Judgment. DependabilityIntegrityDecisivenessTactInitiativeEndurance.

Marine Leadership Traits | Marines.com

https://www.marines.com/m/being-a-marine/leadership

United States Marine Corps
Find out about the traits instilled in every Marine that make them successful leaders on the battlefield and in the community. Justice. Judgment. DependabilityIntegrityDecisivenessTactInitiative.Endurance.
You've visited this page 2 times. Last visit: 8/26/16

Leadership Principles | Marine Officer Requirements | Marines.com

www.marines.com/being-a-marine/leadership-principles

United States Marine Corps
Marine Officers and Officer Candidates follow 11 principles that form the foundation of all ... Use theleadership traits to evaluate your strengths and weaknesses.



Marine Corps Leadership Traits

www.au.af.mil/.../usmc/leadership_traits.ht...

United States Department of the Air Force
The 14 leadership traits are qualities of thought and action which, if demonstrated in daily activities, help Marines earn the respect, confidence, and loyal ...

How To Apply Marine Leadership Traits To Business - Task & Purpose

taskandpurpose.com/14-marine-leadership-traits-apply-business/

Oct 21, 2014 - The 14 leadership traits that every Marine learns in the Corps can also be applied to the business world. ... JJDIDTIEBUCKLE (pronounced “JJ did tie buckle”), representing justice, judgement, dependability, integrity, decisiveness, tact, initiative, endurance, bearing ...
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[PDF]RP 0103 - Principles of Marine Corps Leadership 1. INTRODUCTION

www.tecom.marines.mil/Portals/120/Docs/Student%20Materials/.../RP0103.pdf

In a military environment, identify the leadership traits and principles of the Marine. Corps, per the ... By the time he retired from the Marine Corps in 1951 he had.

USMC Leadership Traits – JJDIDTIEBUCKLE - txdevildog.com

www.txdevildog.com/backbone-usmc-leadership-traits-jjdidtiebuckle/

Jul 19, 2013 - by Cpl. Beddoe, 2013. JJDIDTIEBUCKLE is an acronym used by Marines representing their 14 leadership traits. Justice, Judgment ...

14 Leadership Traits Of The Marine Corps Flashcards by ProProfs

www.proprofs.com › Home › Create › Flashcards › Force › Marine Corp

The practice of being fair and consistent. To give consideration to both sides of a situation and base reward or punishment on merit. Be honest with yourself ...

Your Business and the 14 Marine Corps Leadership Traits

https://oneboldmove.com/the-14-marine-corps-leadership-traits-and-your-business/

These 14 Marine Corps leadership traits are taught to every Marine on the planet. They are engrained in his or her very fiber. I learned them at Marine Corps ...